Creamy Cacio on a plate “Cacio Sburrante al piatto”

It cannot be defined a pecorino because it is made with sheep and cow milk (50% sh. + 50% c.); therefore, it is defined as mixed or two-milk cheese.
Not everyone knows that “cacio” (colloquial for cheese) comes from the Latin“caseum” (cheese). Over time it has turned into caxo, then became casio, cascio, and finally turned into càcio.
Another origin of the name "formaggio" (cheese) derives from the Greek "formos", which was the wicker basket in which curdled milk was placed to make the cheese and also give it its shape. The Greek "formos" then became the Roman "forma" which eventually turned into "fromage" (old French). Today the Italian word for cheese is "formaggio" which derives from the French "fromage".
During the cheese making process of this cheese, the curds are split into big chunks, known as “walnut-hazelnut" sized splitting. The cheese is particularly creamy thanks to the size of the curd chunks and type of enzymes used.

Ingredients:
pasteurised sheep and cow MILK, live milk enzymes, rennet and salt.
Weight: Approximately 1.5 Kg.
Packing: without wrapping, comes in a plate.
Shelf life of packed product: 120 days.

ALLERGENS: MILK and MILK protein

Cheese characteristics:
SHAPE: bowl-shaped, also typical of all Tuscan pecorino, with two flat surfaces and rounded sides.
EXTERNAL FEATURES: a very thin pale yellow rind, the upper side shows a pattern of small squares given by the straining baskets when the whey is drained.
INTERNAL FEATURES: the cheese texture is soft and elastic and is white to a very pale yellow. The eyes are uneven in size, shape and distribution.
ODOR: one can smell cream, butter and yeast.
FLAVOUR: the paste is slightly sticky to the palate and is very delicate yet tasty, tempting and slightly salty. Medium persistence.

Availability:
all year.
Food Pairing: it is a very delicate cheese so we advise trying it as it is, its sweetness will also make a pleasant contrast to tasty cold cuts. It is also great with vegetable casseroles because it tends to melt and become slightly stringy.
Wine Pairing: goes well with any light and non-aromatic white wine which and with light delicate and young red wines.

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